The Case for Complementary Therapies

Published on 23rd February 2018

The Case for Complementary Therapies

Most people wh want to study our anatomy and physiology courses are either trained in or wanting to qualify in a complementary therapy whether it be massage, bown technique, reflexology, kinesiology or aromatherapy to name a few.

The research shows that what we refer to as alternative or complementary therapies are actually becoming more mainstream.

“About half of GPs in the UK now provide access to forms of therapy outside conventional medicine and these have soared in popularity over the past 10 years”

“Combining conventional medicine with complementary therapies is referred to as 'integrative medicine', and many GPs now take this integrative approach – as up to one in three patients request these therapies”

“'Recent research carried out at the Haven Breast Cancer charity showed that as many as 89 per cent of patients feel better as the result of receiving complementary therapies alongside traditional medical treatment”

“At least one in four people in England are thought to have used complementary or alternative therapy in the past year”

“In recent surveys, 85 per cent of medical students, 76 per cent of GPs and 69 per cent of hospital doctors have said they feel that complementary therapies should be made available on the NHS”

"At least one in four people in England are thought to have used complementary or alternative therapy in the past year. In recent surveys, 85 per cent of medical students, 76 per cent of GPs and 69 per cent of hospital doctors have said they feel that complementary therapies should be made available on the NHS." source

"At the end of the 10-week treatment, nearly 40 percent of patients in the massage groups said their pain was nearly or completely gone, compared to 4 percent in the usual care group, which included treatments such as taking pain medications or muscle relaxants, seeing doctors or physical therapists, or not doing anything."

These facts (and there are many more) speak for themselves and should encourage the would be and aspiring therapist to put themselves out there and believe in themselves and what they offer. It is also the right time to begin approaching gp's surgeries to consider referring patients to them for chronic conditions.

Many Gp surgeries are allowing therapists to operate from their premises and we should take these chinks of light as positive signs that there is a place for us to help improve the nations health. Go on, go out and spread the word!

 

 

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